Researchers have found that electrical stimulation can speed wound healing

Researchers have found that electrical stimulation can speed wound healing

A new study suggests that electrical stimulation may help blood vessels deliver white blood cells and oxygen to the wound to speed up healing, foreign media reported. The latest study, published in Royal Society of Journal Labs on a Chip, found that stable electrical stimulation can increase the permeability of blood vessels and provide new insights into how new blood vessels grow.

It is understood that in the case of fluid flow, electrical stimulation provides a constant voltage and accompanied by the current. The results suggest that stimulation increases the permeability of blood vessels — an important trait that helps wound healing substances in the blood reach wounds more efficiently.

“Some have speculated that they would grow better if electricity stimulated blood vessels,” said Study senior author Shaurya Prakash, an associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Ohio State University. We found that the cell response in our vascular models shows important prospects for changing vascular permeability, which has positive results for our ongoing wound healing efforts. ”

Blood vessels are essential for wound healing: they run through the body and carry nutrients, cells, and chemicals that help control inflammation caused by wounds. Oxygen and white blood cells — which protect the body from foreign invasion — are two key components of blood vessel delivery.

But when we get hurt, like a wound on our fingers, the vascular structure at the wound is damaged. It also destroys the ability of blood vessels to help heal wounds. As part of the healing process, blood vessels regenerate themselves like branches without external power.

“As blood vessels begin to grow, they replenish the skin and cells and re-establish a healing barrier,” Prakash said. But our question is: how do you make the process better and faster, and what good is it? ”

In laboratory tests using human cells, the researchers found that a significant increase in vascular permeability shown by electrical stimulation of blood vessels was a physical marker suggesting that new blood vessels might grow.

“These initial findings are exciting, and the next phase of work will require us to look at whether and how to cultivate new blood vessels,” Prakash said.

Jon Song, an associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Ohio State University and co-author of the study, said the results showed that one of the main ways blood vessels heal damage is by allowing molecules and cells to move around the walls of blood vessels.

The study showed that changes in vascular permeability allowed these blood-sourced cells to reach the wound faster, but it did not explain why this happened. The study seems to suggest that currently affects the proteins that sustain blood vessel cells, but these results are not conclusive.